"Freedom’s Crescent" book talk with Prof. John C. Rodrigue

Coming Soon
Rodrigue talk
Information
Wednesday, March 20th 2024
Doors open at 5:30 P.M., talk will begin at 6 P.M.
All ages
Free
Overview

The Louisiana Old State Capitol will host its 3rd lecture on Reconstruction as part of the planning process for the upcoming permanent exhibit, "A More Perfect Union," scheduled to open in 2025. The event will take place on Wednesday, March 20, beginning at 6 P.M. at the Old State Capitol.

The lecture will feature Professor John C. Rodrigue, the Lawrence and Theresa Salameno Professor in the History Department at Stonehill College in Easton, Massachusetts. Prof. Rodrigue's presentation will be based on his latest book, "Freedom’s Crescent: The Civil War and the Destruction of Slavery in the Lower Mississippi Valley.”

Professor Rodrigue's lecture will explore the multifaceted process of emancipation and the abolition of slavery in Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Tennessee during and immediately after the Civil War. The presentation integrates military campaigns, political developments, and the "on-the-ground" disintegration of slavery in the countryside, offering insights into the consequences of emancipation that shaped the postwar Reconstruction period.

Attendees will have the opportunity to engage with one of the leading scholars in this field and gain a deeper understanding of the historical events that shaped the region.

"A More Perfect Union" is a forthcoming permanent exhibit at the Louisiana Old State Capitol, funded by a Rebirth grant from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. The exhibit will provide a comprehensive look into the Civil War and Reconstruction era, offering a unique perspective on this transformative period in history. It is set to open to the public in 2025.

The Louisiana Old State Capitol invites the community to attend this lecture, marking a significant step in the journey towards the "A More Perfect Union" exhibit. This event is free and open to the public



This program is funded under a grant from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.